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PAD Treatment and Innovations
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 12 Noon (Eastern Time)

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Jaikirshan Khatri, MD

  • Cardiologist
  • Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardivascular Medicine

Lee Kirksey, MD

  • Vascular Surgeon
  • Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) -- also known as peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries -- is a disorder that occurs in the arteries of the circulatory system. Arteries are the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrient-rich blood from the heart to all areas of the body. PAD occurs in the arteries that carry blood to the arms and legs. Please take this time to ask cardiologist Jaikirshan Khatri, MD, and vascular surgeon Lee Kirksey, MD, your questions on PAD.

Healthy arteries have a smooth lining that prevents blood from clotting and promotes steady blood flow. In PAD, the arteries slowly become narrowed or blocked when plaque gradually forms inside the artery walls. Plaque is made of excessive fat, cholesterol and other substances floating through the bloodstream, such as inflammatory cells, proteins and calcium. If the arteries become narrowed or blocked, blood cannot get through to nourish organs and other tissues, causing damage to the tissues and eventually tissue death.

Risk factors for PAD include smoking, diabetes, age, race, history of heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Conditions associated with PAD include heart attack, stroke, transient ischemic attack, renal artery disease, and amputation.

Peripheral arterial disease starts when fatty deposits start streaking the blood vessel walls. The fatty matter builds up. This causes slight injury to your blood vessel walls. In an attempt to heal itself, the cells release chemicals that make the walls stickier. Other substances floating through your bloodstream start sticking to the vessel walls, such as inflammatory cells, proteins and calcium. The fat and other substances combine to form a material called plaque or atherosclerosis. The plaque builds up and narrows the artery.

Jaikirshan J. Khatri, MD, FACC, FSCAI, is a cardiologist in the Section of Interventional Cardiology and Vascular Medicine in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. He sees patients at Cleveland Clinic Main Campus.

His specialty interests include Coronary chronic total occlusion; carotid artery stenting; peripheral interventions, including iliac, femoral, below-knee, subclavian, mesenteric and renal; atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale closure (congenital heart defects).

Lee Kirksey, MD, is a vascular surgeon in the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Cleveland Clinic’s Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. He is board certified in surgery with special qualifications in vascular surgery and is a registered vascular technologist.

Prior to his 2011 appointment to the Cleveland Clinic medical staff, Dr. Kirksey was assistant professor of surgery in The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and was on staff at the Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, and Director of the Penn Wound Care Center. His previous positions included Attending Surgeon, Chief of Endovascular Therapy and Development and Director of the Noninvasive Vascular Laboratory, all at The Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia.

His specialty interests include Carotid artery disease, peripheral artery disease, venous insufficiency, bypass surgery for atherosclerosis/PAD/PVD , carotid endarterectomy, carotid stenting, dialysis access surgery, endovascular repair of carotid artery disease, limb salvage, wound care, minimally invasive treatment of abdominal aortic disease.

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