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Cardiomyopathy in Adults and Children
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 12 Noon (Eastern Time)

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Gerard Boyle, MD

  • Medical Director of Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Services

Wilson Tang, MD

  • Director of the Cleveland Clinic Cardiomyopathy Program

Cardiomyopathy is a disease of the heart muscle. It makes it harder for the heart to fill with blood and to pump blood. Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of heart failure and one of the most common conditions leading to heart transplantation.

Take this opportunity to have your questions answered by Cleveland Clinic cardiomyopathy experts, Gerard Boyle, MD, and Wilson Tang, MD.

Cardiomyopathy can affect people of all ages and races. Cardiomyopathy is a disease of the heart muscle. It makes it harder for the heart to fill with blood and to pump blood. Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of heart failure and one of the most common conditions leading to heart transplantation. The condition can also cause abnormal heart rhythms.

One of the major advances in our understanding of cardiomyopathies is the use of genetic testing. This allows us to identify the specific genetic mutations that lead to the disease and detect mutation carriers even before the disease begins. Advanced imaging techniques also allow to identify problems with the heart muscle and plan the best treatment possible. In addition, new drugs and devices are being developed to treat patients with some forms of cardiomyopathy.

Gerard Boyle, MD, is the Medical Director of Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Services at Cleveland Clinic. He joined Cleveland Clinic in 2004. He is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. Dr. Boyle’s areas of specialization are pediatric heart transplantation and congestive heart failure. He is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the sub-specialty Board of Pediatric Cardiology. His specialty interests include pediatric congestive heart failure, pediatric heart transplantation, pediatric ventricular assist devices (VAD), protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD).

Dr. Boyle received his medical degree with Distinction in Research from the State University of New York, College of Medicine, Brooklyn. He completed his residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric cardiology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and subsequently advanced to Associate Professor of Pediatrics at The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Boyle has been a consultant to hospitals in both Pennsylvania and Ohio. He is a diplomat of the National Board of Medical Examiners and is certified in Pediatric Advanced Life Support and Basic Cardiac Life Support[NU1].

W.H. Wilson Tang, MD, is Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Clinical Genomics; Research Director, and staff cardiologist in the Section of Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Medicine in the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic; and Professor of Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. As Director of the Cardiomyopathy program, Dr. Tang’s specialty interests include cardiomyopathy, heart failure, heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory assist devices.

Dr. Tang graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in neural sciences from Brown University in Rhode Island, where he received an honorary one-year period of study of the natural sciences at Jesus College, Cambridge University, in England. Dr. Tang received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine and a research fellowship in heart failure at Stanford University Medical Center. This was followed by clinical cardiology fellowship training at the Cleveland Clinic, and an advanced clinical fellowship in heart failure and cardiac transplantation. He was appointed to Cleveland Clinic in 2004 as a Staff Physician in the Section of Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Medicine. He is board-certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology. Dr. Tang is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and a Fellow of the American Heart Association (AHA), and has committee appointments in the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA). He serves as member of the writing committee for both ACC/AHA and HFSA clinical guidelines in the management of heart failure. He is also a member of the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

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