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Blood Clotting Disorders
Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 12:30 PM (Eastern Time)

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Marcelo Gomes, MD

  • Staff, Vascular Medicine

Cleveland Clinic's Thrombosis Center is a multidisciplinary specialty treatment group dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of hypercoagulable conditions or thrombophilia. The Thrombosis Center brings together clinicians that specialize in blood clotting disorders. The team includes physicians and nurses from Cardiovascular Medicine (Cardiology and Vascular Medicine), the Cancer Institute (Hematology), Laboratory Medicine, Pediatrics, Genetics, Internal Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Cardiovascular and Vascular Surgery, Cardiovascular Anesthesiology, Interventional Radiology and the Lerner Research Institute. Please join us for our Rare Blood Clotting Disorders Health Chat, where Dr. Gomes will be answering your questions.

Hypercoagulable states can be dangerous, especially when these conditions are not properly identified and treated. People with hypercoagulable states have an increased risk for blood clots developing in the arteries (blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart) and veins (blood vessels that carry blood to the heart). A clot inside a blood vessel is also called a thrombus or an embolus.

Blood clots in the veins or venous system can travel through the bloodstream and cause deep vein thrombosis (a blood clot in the veins of the pelvis, leg, arm, liver, intestines or kidneys) or a pulmonary embolus (blood clot in the lungs). Blood clots in the arteries can increase the risk for stroke, heart attack, severe leg pain, difficulty walking, or even the loss of a limb.

Hypercoagulable states are usually genetic (inherited) or acquired conditions. The genetic form of this disorder means a person is born with the tendency to form blood clots. Acquired conditions are usually a result of surgery, trauma, medications or a medical condition that increases the risk of hypercoagulable states.

Marcelo P. Villa-Forte Gomes, MD, in a Staff Member in the Section of Vascular Medicine, the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, at the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic. He was appointed to Cleveland Clinic in 2003. He is board-certified in internal medicine and vascular medicine. His specialty interests include deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, hypercoagulable states, thrombophilia, peripheral arterial disease and anticoagulant therapy.

Dr. Gomes has a wide range of research and treatment interests, including blood clotting disorders, carotid artery disease, claudication, deep venous thrombosis, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, hypercoagulable states, peripheral arterial disease, peripheral vascular disease, pulmonary embolism and thrombophilia.

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