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Advanced Coronary Artery Disease
Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 12 Noon (Eastern Time)

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Mouin Abdallah, MD

  • Cardiologist
  • Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Jaikirshan Khatri, MD

  • Cardiologist
  • Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Coronary artery disease is the narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, due to atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis (sometimes called “hardening” or “clogging” of the arteries) is the buildup of cholesterol and fatty deposits (called plaques) on the inner walls of the arteries. These plaques can restrict blood flow to the heart muscle by physically clogging the artery or by causing abnormal artery tone and function. Take this opportunity to have your questions answered by cardiologists Mouin Abdallah, MD, and Jaikirshan Khatri, MD.

Your heart is a strong muscular pump that is responsible for moving about 3,000 gallons of blood through your body every day. Like other muscles, your heart requires a continuous supply of blood to work properly. Your heart muscle gets the blood it needs to do its job from the coronary arteries.

Coronary artery disease is the narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, due to atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis (sometimes called “hardening” or “clogging” of the arteries) is the buildup of cholesterol and fatty deposits (called plaques) on the inner walls of the arteries. These plaques can restrict blood flow to the heart muscle by physically clogging the artery or by causing abnormal artery tone and function.

Without an adequate blood supply, the heart becomes starved of oxygen and the vital nutrients it needs to work properly. This can cause chest pain called angina. If blood supply to a portion of the heart muscle is cut off entirely, or if the energy demands of the heart become much greater than its blood supply, a heart attack may occur.

Mouin Sami Abdallah, MD, MSc, is a cardiologist specializing in general cardiology and cardiovascular imaging in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. He sees patients at Cleveland Clinic main campus. Specialty interests include general cardiology, coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, echocardiography, electrocardiology, nuclear cardiology, stress testing, cardiovascular disease prevention and congestive heart failure, quality of care and outcomes research.

Jaikirshan J. Khatri, MD, FACC, FSCAI, is a cardiologist in the Section of Interventional Cardiology and Vascular Medicine in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. He sees patients at Cleveland Clinic Main Campus. Specialty interests include coronary chronic total occlusion; carotid artery stenting; peripheral interventions, including iliac, femoral, below-knee, subclavian, mesenteric and renal; atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale closure (congenital heart defects).

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