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Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)
Thursday, July 13, 2017 - 12 Noon (Eastern Time)

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Milind Desai, MD

  • Staff Cardiologist
  • Section of Cardiovascular Imaging
  • Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Maran Thamilarasan, MD

  • Staff Cardiologist
  • Section of Cardiovascular Imaging
  • Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease that affects the heart muscle, causing the muscle to enlarge, or "hypertrophy." At Cleveland Clinic's Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute, we have a special interest in treating Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Since 1978, we have treated hundreds of patients and the numbers are increasing each year. Please join us for our Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Web Chat and have your questions answered by Cleveland Clinic staff cardiologists Milind Desai, MD, and Maran Thamilarasan, MD.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex type of heart disease that affects the heart muscle. It causes thickening of the heart muscle (especially the ventricles, or lower heart chambers), left ventricular stiffness, mitral valve changes and cellular changes.

The type of HCM treatment prescribed depends on whether there is narrowing in the outflow tract (the path blood travels to leave the heart), how the heart is functioning, the patient’s symptoms, the age and activity level of the patient, and the presence of arrhythmias. Treatment is aimed at minimizing or preventing symptoms and reducing the risk of complications, such as heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy affects an estimated 600,000 to 1.5 million Americans, or one in 500 people. It is more prevalent than multiple sclerosis, which affects one in 700 people.

Milind Desai, MD, is a staff cardiologist in the Section of Cardiovascular Imaging in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic. He is a Professor of Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. He holds dual appointments in the departments of cardiovascular medicine and radiology.

Dr. Desai is an expert in multimodality cardiovascular imaging, having achieved the highest level of proficiency in all imaging modalities, including cardiac MRI, cardiac CT, echocardiography and nuclear cardiology. He is the Director of Cardiovascular Imaging Research and serves on the Heart & Vascular Institute Research Council and Clinical Investigations Committee. His specialty interests include heart valve disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aortic disorders, complex coronary artery disease, pericardial disease, pericarditis, radiation heart disease. Dr. Desai has special interest in multimodality cardiovascular imaging, including echocardiogram, computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Maran Thamilarasan, MD, is a staff cardiologist in the Section of Cardiovascular Imaging, the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, at the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. Board-certified as a Diplomate in cardiovascular disease, Dr. Thamilarasan also is certified Diplomate by the National Board of Medical Examiners. He is also certified by the National Board of Echocardiography. He has focused his specialty interests on echocardiography, valvular heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, diseases of the aorta and coronary artery disease.

A native of India, Dr. Thamilarasan grew up in the United States. He did his undergraduate work in biomedical sciences and political science at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, graduating with Highest Distinction and inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. As an undergraduate, Dr. Thamilarasan received the James B. Angell Scholar Award and the Regents-Alumni Scholarship Award. He continued on at the University of Michigan to receive his medical degree, graduating cum laude. He was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, and received the American Society of Clinical Pathologist's Award.

Dr. Thamilarasan did his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical Center. Cleveland Clinic awarded him a fellowship in cardiology followed by an advanced fellowship in cardiac imaging. He has been with the Cleveland Clinic since 1995.

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